Shelter Statistics

Cache Humane Society is a committed member of Best Friend's No Kill Utah Coalition, a group of 50+ Utah animal welfare organizations striving to bring our statewide lifesaving percentage to 90% by 2019. We will reach this goal by increasing our shelter's Lifesaving Percentage and by routinely transferring in at-risk animals from shelters across the state.

Our Lifesaving Percentage is calculated by dividing our Live Outcomes (Reclaimed-by-Owner, Adopted, Transferred, and TNR) by our Total Outcomes. In 2016, we achieved a 91% Feline Lifesaving Percentage and a 97% Canine Lifesaving Percentage.

We are committed to saving even more lives in 2017. We are grateful for the community support that allows us to focus on our biggest challenges, including improving neonatal kitten survival through an expanded foster program. With your help, we can Save Them All.

Below are the statistics for the past 15 months of shelter operations. There are separate graphs for each species type, one each for intakes and outgoing animals, further separated by type. Click on a button to view the graphs for that animal type.

Legend

Intakes

  • Stray/At Large: Admitted by Animal Control or brought in as an un-owned or free-roaming animal. Cache Humane Society holds all of these animals for 5 days to give their owners time to find them. Impounded animals looking for their owners can be viewed here.
  • Surrendered: We provide a judgment-free, safe environment when pet owners feel they can no longer provide for their pet. We are committed to finding loving homes for all adoptable pets surrendered to Cache Humane Society.
  • Owner-requested Euthanasia: Cache Humane Society recognizes that compassionate euthanasia services fill an important need when pets are beyond treatment for illness or injury and quality of life is irreparably diminished.
  • Transferred-in: As a committed member of No Kill Utah (NKUT), we routinely rescue unclaimed animals from impound facilities across northern Utah. We also reach out to over-crowded shelters for large rescue operations targeting at-risk dogs.
  • Other intakes: Animals born on site and other intakes.

Outcomes

  • Adoptions: Animals who found their forever homes!
  • Returned to Owner: Stray pets reclaimed by their owners.
  • Transferred-out: We network with dozens of no-kill rescue organizations that provide treatment and training for animals that need more help than the shelter can provide. We also transfer long-term shelter animals to adoption centers with higher adoption rates to give them an even better chance at finding their home.
  • Other Positive Outcomes: Animals returned-to-field and other live outcomes.
  • Lost in Care: Animals who went missing while in care. This could be due to escape, theft, or other unknown outcome.
  • Died in Care: Animals who passed away while in care. We strive to provide the best veterinary care possible, but animals sometimes enter our facility with significant injuries or illness. We also face the challenge of nursing neonatal kittens through infancy. Please think carefully before bringing in litters of baby kittens; mom is often nearby. If you are interested in helping us bottle-feed kittens, please consider providing a foster home.
  • Shelter Euthanasia: As committed members of the No Kill Utah (NKUT) coalition, we reserve euthanasia for animals that are sick or injured beyond treatment, or can not be sheltered or adopted safely.